Key Personnel 

Principal Investigator

Michael G. Katze, Ph. D., Transcriptional Analysis Core Leader
University of Washington

Dr. Katze is Professor of Microbiology, School of Medicine and Associate Director at the Washington National Primate Research Center. He is an experienced virologist and leader in applying genomic and proteomic technologies to the study of virus-host interactions and the interferon response. Most recently, his laboratory has published studies in which genomic analysis was used to gain new insights into the pathogenesis of the reconstructed 1918 pandemic virus.

Katze Laboratory

Influenza

Yoshihiro Kawaoka, Ph. D., Influenza Virus Research Leader
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Kawaoka has extensive experience in influenza virus research. His group studies the molecular pathogenesis, host range restriction, and mechanism of influenza virus replication. Using reverse genetics, Dr. Kawaoka demonstrated that a single mutation is critical for high virulence of H5N1 influenza viruses in mammals. Dr Kawaoka, in collaboration with Drs Katze and Feldmann, reconstructed the 1918 Spanish influenza virus and revealed a mechanism by which this virus caused severe disease in humans.
Kawaoka laboratory provides the highly pathogenic wild-type viruses and engineered viruses with attenuated pathogenicity need in our studies and performs all of the influenza infections in cell and mouse models.

Collaborator Profile: University of Wisconsin-Madison

SARS-Coronavirus

Ralph S. Baric, Ph. D., SARS-CoV Research Leader
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Dr. Baric is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has studied the biology, pathogenesis and replication of viruses for about 30 years, specializing in Coronaviruses, Noroviruses as well as virus detection in environmental samples. Dr. Baric has developed novel reverse genetic systems for coronaviruses, including the highly pathogenic SARS-CoV. The Baric laboratory provides the wild-type SARS viruses and engineered viruses with attenuated pathogenicity need in our studies and performs all of the SARS infections in cell and mouse models.

Collaborator Profile: University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Mathematical Modeling & Informatics Core

Katrina M. Waters, Ph. D., Mathematical Modeling and Informatics Core Leader
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Dr. Waters' interests are focused around the analysis and biological interpretation of global gene and protein expression data related to mechanism of action or applied research, such as biomarker discovery. In addition, she has developed and carried out molecular and biochemical assays in the laboratory to test hypotheses resulting from microarray experiments. This core is responsible for data integration, simulations, network reconstruction (utilizing empirical and de novo approaches), and model prediction and validation.

Collaborator Profile: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
 

Macaque Infection Model

Heinz Feldmann, M.D., Ph.D., Chief
Rocky Mountain Laboratories

Heinz Feldmann is Chief of the Laboratory of Virology at Rocky Mountain Laboratories and Chief Scientist of the BSL-4 laboratories. He is an expert on high containment viruses and serves as a consultant on viral hemorrhagic fevers and related pathogens for the World Health Organization. The Systems Virology Cores will receive samples from Dr. Feldmann’s ongoing non-human primate studies involving both influenza and SARS infections.

Proteomics & Metabolomics Core

Richard D. Smith, Ph. D., Proteomics & Metabolomics Core Leader
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Dr. Smith is a Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA. He has extensive experience in proteomics and mass spectrometry, particularly in the area of FTICR-MS. Dr. Smith has interests in increasing the throughput and sensitivity of proteomics and metabolomics measurements to augment systems biology approaches to biomedical research.

Collaborator Profile: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory